Transforming Heart Disease Care in Low-Resource Settings via Implementation Science and Financial Technology: Experience from Kenya | Duke Kunshan University

Transforming Heart Disease Care in Low-Resource Settings via Implementation Science and Financial Technology: Experience from Kenya

E.g., 12/14/2019
E.g., 12/14/2019
11/21
17:30 to- 18:30
IB1046

ABSTRACT:

Dr. Vedanthan will describe the global burden heart disease, the treatment gaps, and the challenges to providing heart disease care in low-resource settings. He will then describe the efforts of his team in western Kenya to address these challenges, while emphasizing the importance and contribution of implementation research to these efforts. At the end of this meeting, participants should be able to:

  • Understand global burden of heart disease and risk factors
  • Describe challenges contributing to the treatment gaps
  • Appreciate the importance of implementation research to improving care delivery for heart disease
  • Recognize the contribution of design thinking to intervention development and application to implementation research

BIO:

Dr. Rajesh Vedanthan is the Director of the Section for Global Health in the Department of Population Health at the New York University School of Medicine. He is Associate Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Medicine/Cardiology. His area of interest is implementation research, global health delivery, global cardiology, capacity-building, and the intersection of health and development. He is the Principal Investigator or co-investigator of multiple NIH grants, including a Fogarty International Research Scientist Development Award (K01) focused on nurse management of hypertension; a U01 project to evaluate novel strategies to optimize linkage and retention to a hypertension management program in rural western Kenya; an R01 project to evaluate the effectiveness of group medical visits and microfinance groups for cardiovascular risk reduction among at-risk individuals in rural western Kenya; a U01 grant to strengthen referral networks for hypertension control among patients in western Kenya; an R21 project that aims to identify spatial risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and use to generate a spatial model that predicts CVD events in the Golestan Cohort Study; and a U01 grant to improve cardiovascular risk reduction among patients living with HIV in the United States.